Sanctioned by EU – 32 Named Individuals

Standard
32 individual members of the authoritarian regime in Iran have been identified by the European Union (EU) through verified reports as being complicit in, or responsible for directing or implementing serious violations of human rights, either now or in the events that followed the June 2009 Presidential election. Restrictive measures will be applied to these individuals by all EU member states. The EU reserves the right to amend this list at any time, depending on the political situation in Iran, and subject to the submission of substantial evidence.

This list is far short of the 80 names issued by the EU in March, and both lists fail to include the leadership of the regime, starting with Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, even though they are clearly responsible for directing the actions of others which have resulted in the repression, torture and execution of people inside Iran. The One Million Voices Campian for Iran, which has been lobbying for financial and travel restrictions on members of the regime in response to human rights abuses has a more comprehensive list.

The sanctions only apply to financial assets (savings, investments, shareholdings, etc) held in EU member states, and can be circumvented by claiming that they are required to cover the cost of basic needs, or for “reasonable” or “extraordinary” fees or expenses. Interest earned is not affected, and perhaps most importantly, the EU offers no evidence to show that any of these 32 individuals actually hold any financial interests that can be controlled by EU member states.

In contrast to previous restrictions, there are no sanctions against travel to or within the EU. The list of names is here:

1. AHMADI-MOQADDAM Esmail, Chief of Iran’s National Police.
Forces under his command led brutal attacks on peaceful protests, and a violent night time attack on the dormitories of Tehran University on June 15, 2009. 
2. ALLAHKARAM Hossein, Ansar-e Hezbollah Chief and Colonel in the IRGC.
He co-founded Ansar-e Hezbollah. This paramilitary force was responsible for extreme violence during crackdown against students and universities in 1999, 2002 and 2009. 
3. ARAGHI (ERAGHI) Abdollah, Deputy Head of IRGC’s Ground Forces.
He had a direct and personal responsibility in the crackdown of protests all through the Summer of 2009. 
4. FAZLI Ali, Deputy Commander of the Basij, former Head of the IRGC’s Seyyed al-Shohada Corps, Tehran Province (until February 2010).
The Seyyed al- Shohada Corps is in charge of security in Tehran province and played a key role in brutal repression of protesters in 2009. 
5. HAMEDANI Hossein, Head of the IRGC’s Rassoulollah Corps in charge of Greater Tehran since November 2009.
The Rassoulollah Corps is in charge of security in greater Tehran, and played a key role in violent suppression of protesters in 2009. Responsible for the crackdown of protests through Ashura events (December 2009) and since. 
6. JAFARI Mohammad-Ali (a.k.a. “Aziz Jafari”), General Commander of the IRGC.
IRGC and the Sarollah Base commanded by General Aziz Jafari has played a key role in illegally inter fering with the 2009 Presidential Elections, arresting and detaining political activists, as well as clashing with protestors in the streets. 
7. KHALILI Ali, IRGC General, Head of the Medical Unit of Sarollah Base.
He signed a letter sent to the Ministry of Health June 26 2009 forbidding the submission of documents or medical records to anyone injured or hospitalized during post-elections events. 
8. MOTLAGH Bahram Hosseini, Head of the IRGC’s Seyyed al-Shohada Corps, Tehran Province.
The Seyyed al-Shohada Corps played a key role in organising the repression of protests.
9. NAQDI Mohammad-Reza, Commander of the Basij.
As commander of the IRGC’s Basij Forces, Naqdi was responsible for or complicit in Basij abuses occurring in late 2009, including the violent response to the December 2009 Ashura Day protests, which resulted in up to 15 deaths and the arrests of hundreds of protesters. Prior to his appointment as commander of the Basij in October 2009, Naqdi was the head of the intelligence unit of the Basij responsible for interrogating those arrested during the post- election crackdown. 
10. RADAN Ahmad-Reza, Deputy Chief of Iran’s National Police.
As Deputy Chief of National Police since 2008, Radan was responsible for beatings, murder, and arbitrary arrests and detentions against protestors that were committed by the police forces. 
11. RAJABZADEH Azizollah, Former Head of Tehran Police (until January 2010).
As Commander of the Law Enforcement Forces in the Greater Tehran, Azizollah Rajabzadeh is the highest ranking accused in the case of abuses in Kahrizak Detention Center. 
12. SAJEDI-NIA Hossein, Head of Tehran Police, former Deputy Chief of Iran’s National Police responsible for Police Operations.
He is in charge of coordinating, for the Ministry of Interior, repression operations in the Iranian capital. 
13. TAEB Hossein, Former Commander of the Basij (until October 2009).
Currently deputy IRGC commander for intelligence. Forces under his command participated in mass beatings, murders, detentions and tortures of peaceful protestors. 
14. SHARIATI Seyeed Hassan, Head of Mashhad Judiciary.
Trials under his supervision have been conducted summarily and inside closed sessions, without adherence to basic rights of the accused, and with reliance on confessions extracted under pressure and torture. As execution rulings were issued en masse, death sentences were issued without proper observance of fair hearing procedures. 
15. DORRI-NADJAFABADI Ghorban-Ali, Former Prosecutor General of Iran until September 2009 (former Intelligence minister under Khatami presidency).
As Prosecutor General of Iran, he ordered and supervised the show trials following the first post-election protests, where the accused were denied their rights, an attorney. He also carries responsibility for the Kahrizak abuses.. 
16. HADDAD Hassan (alias Hassan ZAREH DEHNAVI), Judge, Tehran Revolutionary Court, branch 26.
He was charge of the detainee cases related to the post election crises and regularly threatened families of detainees in order to silence them. He has been instrumental in issuing detention orders to the Kahrizak Detention Centre.
17. SOLTANI Hodjatoleslam Seyed Mohammad,  Judge, Mashhad Revolutionary Court.
Trials under his jurisdiction have been conducted summarily and inside closed session, without adherence to basic rights of the accused. As execution rulings were issued en masse, death sentences were issued without proper observance of fair hearing procedures. 
18. HEYDARIFAR Ali-Akbar, Judge, Tehran Revolutionary Court.
He participated in protesters trial. He was ques tioned by the Judiciary about Kahrizak exactions. He was instrumental in issuing detention orders to consign detainees to Kahrizak Detention Centre 
19. JAFARI-DOLATABADI Abbas, Prosecutor general of Tehran since August 2009.
Dolatabadi’s office indicted a large number of protesters, including individuals who took part in the December 2009 Ashura Day protests. He ordered the closure of Karroubi’s office in September 2009 and the arrest of several reformist politicians, and he banned two reformist political parties in June 2010. His office charged protesters with the charge of Muharebeh, or enmity against God, which carries a death sentence, and denied due process to those facing the death sentence. His office has also targeted and arrested reformists, human rights activists, and members of the media, as part of a broad crackdown on the political opposition. 
20. MOGHISSEH Mohammad, (a.k.a. NASSERIAN) Judge, Head of Tehran Revolutionary Court, branch 28.
He is in charge of post-election cases. He issued long prison sentences during unfair trials for social, political activists and journalists and several death sentences for protesters and social and political activists. 
21. MOHSENI-EJEI Gholam-Hossein, Prosecutor General of Iran since September 2009 and spokesman of the Judiciary (former Intelligence minister during the 2009 elections).
While he was Intelligence minister during the election, intelligence agents under his command were responsible for detention, torture and extraction of false confessions under pressure from hundreds of activists, journalists, dissidents, and reformist politicians. In addition, political figures were coerced into making false confessions under unbearable interrogations, which included torture, abuse, blackmail, and the threatening of family members. 
22. MORTAZAVI Said, Head of Iran’s Anti-smuggling Task Force, former Prosecutor general of Tehran until August 2009.
As Tehran Prosecutor General, he issued a blanket order used for detention of hundreds of activists, journalists and students. He was suspended from office in August 2010 after an investigation by the Iranian judiciary of his role in the deaths of three men detained on his orders following the election.
23. PIR-ABASSI Abbas, Tehran Revolutionary Court, branches 26 and 28.
He is in charge of post-election cases, he issued long prison sentences during unfair trials against human rights activists and has issued several death sentences for protesters. 
24. MORTAZAVI Amir, Deputy Prosecutor of Mashhad.
Trials under his prosecution have been conducted summarily and inside closed session, without adherence to basic rights of the accused. As execution rulings were issued en masse, death sentences were issued without proper observance of fair hearing procedures. 
25. SALAVATI Abdolghassem, Judge, Head of Tehran Revolutionary Court, branch 15.
In charge of the post-election cases, he was the Judge presiding the “show trials” in summer 2009, he condemned to death two monarchists that appeared in the show trials. He has sentenced more than a hundred political prisoners, human rights activists and demonstrators to lengthy prison sentences. 
26. SHARIFI Malek Adjar, Head of East Azerbaidjan Judiciary.
He was responsible for Sakineh Mohammadi-Ashtiani’s trial. 
27. ZARGAR Ahmad, Judge, Tehran Appeals Court, branch 36.
He confirmed long-term jail warrants and death warrants against protesters. 
28. YASAGHI Ali-Akbar, Judge, Mashhad Revolutionary Court.
Trials under his jurisdiction have been conducted summarily and inside closed session, without adherence to basic rights of the accused. As execution rulings were issued en masse, death sentences were issued without proper observance of fair hearing procedures. 
29. BOZORGNIA Mostafa, Head of ward 350 of Evin Prison. He unleashed on a number of occasions disproportionate violence upon prisoners. 
30. ESMAILI Gholam-Hossein, Head of Iran’s Prisons Organisation.
In this capacity, he was complicit to the massive detention of political protesters and covering up abuses performed in the jailing system. 
31. SEDAQAT Farajollah, Assistant Secretary of the General Prison
Administration in Tehran -Former Head of Evin’s prison, Tehran until October 2010 during which time torture took place. He was warden and threatened and exerted pressure on prisoners numerous times. 
32. ZANJIREI Mohammad-Ali, As Deputy Head of Iran’s Prisons Organisation, responsible for abuses and deprivation of rights in detention center. He ordered the transfer of many inmates into solitary confinement.

Be One in a Million! Sign the Petition at One Million Voices for Iran

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s